What is a podiatrist?

A Podiatrist (the modern word for Chiropodist) diagnoses and treats conditions relating to the foot and lower limb. Both titles are "protected" by the health professions council who ensure practioners have the necessary credentials to practice. To become a podiatrist/chiropodist you have to complete a three year full time degree course in podiatric medicine from a recognised university.
It is illegal to call yourself a podiatrist/chiropodist without being registered with the health professions council.

Why see a Podiatrist?

In a lifetime the average person walks more than 100 000 miles, more than 4 times the circumfrance of the globe. Your feet are the foundations of your body supporting its entire weight. Its no wonder that sometimes problems develop. Most people neglect their feet when really we should give them regular check ups as we do with other parts of our bodies such as eyes and teeth.

"When our feet hurt, we hurt all over"

Podiatry is a field of medicine that strives to improve the overhall health and well being of patients by focusing on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of conditions associated with the foot and lower limb. Podiatrist are unique amongst health professionals in spending the whole of their three year degree course studying the foot and lower limb.

Scope of practice

A Podiatrist can help with most problems that concern the foot and lower limb. This can range from simple corns and callus to minor surgery under local anaesthetic. We also provide specialist care and advise for people with diabetes and arthritis. Problems arising from the way we walk can be assessed and treated. Orthoses (shoes insoles) can be perscribed to improve foot function. Some Podiatrist are qualified to supply perscription only medicines such as antibiotics.

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